Lung Cancer

Boston, MA-What is the best chemotherapy regimen to use for patients with locally advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)? The phase 3 PROCLAIM trial attempted to answer this question, but the study failed to determine the best regimen for this patient population.
What is the best chemotherapy regimen to use for patients with locally advanced nonsquamous non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)? The phase 3 PROCLAIM trial attempted to answer this question, but the study failed to determine the best regimen for this patient population.
“There’s a lot we don’t know about lung cancer screening,” according to Denise Aberle, MD, who spoke at the recent American Association for Cancer Research International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research.
For the first time, a therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has achieved more responses in smokers than nonsmokers. The antibody MPDL3280A also achieved good responses in the squamous and adenoma histologic types of NSCLC.
In the ongoing phase 3 PROFILE 1007 study of patients with previously treated anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small cell lung cancer, crizotinib improved quality of life (QOL) and key lung cancer symptoms compared with chemotherapy.
In a phase 3 head-to-head comparison trial, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor crizotinib proved more effective than standard chemo­therapy with pemetrexed or doce­taxel as a second-line treatment for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with the ALK genetic abnormality.

In a study of more than 20,000 patients 65 and older with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), treatment rates declined more in relation with increasing age than with the worsening of other illnesses.

The study, led by a team at the San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC) and University of California San Francisco (UCSF), found that for all stages of cancer, younger patients were more apt to receive treatment than older patients, regardless of general health and prognosis.

In a study of more than 20,000 patients 65 and older with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), treatment rates declined more in relation with increasing age than with the worsening of other illnesses.

The study, led by a team at the San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC) and University of California San Francisco (UCSF), found that for all stages of cancer, younger patients were more apt to receive treatment than older patients, regardless of general health and prognosis.

In patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer with ALK gene rearrangements, treatment with crizotinib provided clinically meaningful antitumor activity, producing responses in 51% of patients, in a multicenter phase 2 study reported at the 2011 European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress.

Rearrangements in ALK are seen in up to 5% of patients, and crizotinib—a firstin- class, oral, potent, and selective small molecular—competitively inhibits ALK.

On August 26, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved crizotinib (Xalkori) for the treatment of certain patients with late-stage, non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) who express the abnormal anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene.

Between 1% and 7% of patients with NSCLC have the ALK gene abnormality, which causes cancer development and growth. This form of lung cancer is usually found in nonsmokers. Crizotinib works by blocking particular proteins, including the protein produced by the abnormal ALK gene.

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