Supplements

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), officially called the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which began implementation in March 2010 and will not be fully implemented until 2018, has impacted oncology care in both positive and negative ways.
Among the various types of treatment that a patient with cancer may undergo, chemotherapy is associated with the greatest concerns with respect to side effects. Although patients may comprehend the importance of receiving chemotherapy as a key component of their treatment plan, the fear of adverse events (AEs) is always foremost on their minds.
It is inevitable that patients with cancer will experience some side effects associated with treatment. Recommendations for managing and minimizing these complications are critical to patients’ well-being and can impact overall clinical outcomes.
As an oncology pharmacist in an ambulatory cancer clinic, in the course of a typical week, it is not unusual for me to counsel 25 to 30 new patients on chemotherapy regimens that they are about to receive (paying particular attention to adverse events [AEs]), and to be directly involved in the monitoring and management of countless other patients who present with side effects associated with their treatments.
This second issue of Conquering the Cancer Care Continuum™ focuses on the serious nature of the problems associated with access to care. Whether it be access to cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, or follow-up care, it is an issue that remains unresolved.
The state of healthcare in 2014 necessitates that patients play an active role in the management of their health. But who, among Americans, has access to healthcare? This access occurs when an individual is fortunate enough to have available the timely use of services, so he or she can achieve the best health possible.
When I joined the faculty of the McWhorter School of Pharmacy (MSOP) at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama, in July of 2008, I was excited to discover a corporate spirit and passion for involvement with underserved populations that were similar to that of my own.
I am very excited to announce our Third Annual Conquering the Cancer Care Continuum newsletter series. These publications will continue to address highly relevant topics in oncology management. The first issue focuses on current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) and includes articles written by a clinical oncology pharmacist, an oncology nurse practitioner, and a regulatory lawyer.
As a nurse practitioner and a researcher whose focus is on supportive care in cancer, many of my patients and their caregivers look to me for answers to their questions regarding over-the-counter (OTC) supplements and prescription drugs used to treat various disorders. Oftentimes, patients seek my opinion concerning appropriate OTC and prescription drugs for treating such conditions as peripheral neuropathy.
R is a 43-year-old man with a primary hepatocellular carcinoma. He was diagnosed 6 months ago with metastatic disease and today has been told that there are no remaining conventional treatment options available for the management of his cancer. To look at this patient is to see a young man who seems to be otherwise healthy, a man who continues to work full time, to travel, and to be an active husband and father.
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