Ovarian Cancer

In the phase 2 OVARIO study, median progression-free survival has not yet been reached in women with advanced ovarian cancer who are being treated with the combination of niraparib and bevacizumab after response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. The combination did not appear to cause cumulative toxicities.
An all-oral regimen in women with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer did not show superiority to platinum-based regimens on the outcome of progression-free survival.
In a meta-analysis of 7 large randomized clinical trials, PARP inhibitors were not significantly more likely to cause secondary hematologic malignancies compared with control groups.
A pooled analysis of 2 studies using rucaparib for the treatment of patients with recurrent high-grade ovarian cancer supported the approved starting dose of 600 mg twice daily.
A global phase 3 randomized study is currently enrolling patients with stage III or IV high-grade nonmucinous epithelial ovarian cancer to assess the efficacy of an investigational anti–PD-1 humanized monoclonal antibody plus standard of care as first-line treatment and maintenance. The primary outcome measure is progression-free survival.
In a phase 2 study of women with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer, safety and efficacy end points favored the combination of niraparib and bevacizumab over niraparib monotherapy.
New study findings represent a significant advance for women with BRCA-related relapsed ovarian cancer responding to platinum-based chemotherapy.
In the PRIMA study, patients with recurrent ovarian cancer receiving maintenance therapy with an individualized dose of niraparib had similar efficacy compared with placebo as patients receiving a fixed dose of niraparib while experiencing half as many thrombocytopenic events.
In a pooled analysis of 2 randomized trials of rucaparib for the treatment of patients with recurrent high-grade ovarian cancer, deleterious BRCA mutations were identified in 71% of patients with responses lasting at least 1 year but in only 52% of short-term responders.
In a study of 76 English-speaking women with newly diagnosed ovarian cancer who underwent genetic testing, those found to have a pathogenic mutation did not report increased levels of stress, anxiety, or depression compared with pre-genetic testing. Those testing negative for mutations saw their posttest anxiety levels decline.
Page 1 of 5
Results 1 - 10 of 47